Tag Archives: miley cyrus

Miley Unwrecked

Miley Cyrus has released a director’s cut version of Wrecking Ball.

People have responded with confusion and forgiveness for her earlier footage.

This is confusing on a number of levels.

“Oh, well if that’s what she really meant to do, then it’s not as bad.”

Ok, but why would she do it if she had direct control over her image, as so many people (including Cyrus, herself) have suggested? Why would she and the label spend so much on that other weird concrete stuff if it was not really in the original vision?

“Ah, now I see how it was meant to be like Sinead’s Nothing Compares to You. Just a face! Aha!”

Except, the original video was the one Cyrus was comparing to that clip. She’s dulled it down to support her argument about the video.

I think that the most disappointing part of this is that Cyrus tried to defend the video and eventually caved. Why? Wouldn’t her point be more easily made if she stuck to her guns?

I don’t know. Does it matter? What’s the point?

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Weighing in on Miley Cyrus

Recently, Miley Cyrus has been making all kinds of news. It began with her weird VMA stunts, which were criticized for being racist (and ridiculous). Her Wrecking Ball video was equally uproarious and people everywhere felt the need to weigh in. Sinead O’Connor was one of those people. 

She wrote an open letter to Cyrus, stating that she felt it was sad that a teen icon would be signalling to young women that it is ‘okay to prostitute’ themselves. While that may be a bit of a stretch of the truth, and Cyrus’ behaviour arguably does nothing of the sort, O’Connor’s motherly tone conveyed the idea that her heart was in the right place. 

Cyrus spat back that she didn’t have time to respond because she was too busy hosting TV shows and performing. She also posted a screenshot of O’Connor’s Twitter posts, suggesting that she was crazy and, therefore, not worth listening to.

O’Connor became more cutting in her critique (understandably) and told Cyrus she would be there when the young singer ended up in rehab or a psych ward. 

Somewhere amongst the angst, Amanda Palmer also added her two cents in an open letter to O’Connor, defending Cyrus’ choice of representation and suggesting that Cyrus had control over her label, and not the other way around.

The whole sorry affair can be found on the SMH website. The entire situation arguable came about through women’s concern for or judgement of one another in music and dance. Is this a problem? Is this an instance of internalized misogyny? Should it ever have happened?