Tag Archives: sexism in music

Sick of Sexism: Female Artists Speak Out

It’s been an interesting couple months for sexism in the music industry. One of the trends we’ve been seeing of late is female musicians from various genres of music speaking out against sexism and sharing their personal stories. We’ve already commented on ex-teen star Charlotte Church’s comments (check out our blog post for details) and how she didn’t have control over her image. Haley Williams who is the lead singer of Paramore has also spoken out about the way she’s been treated as a lesser part of the group or the token female singer. Chvurches has started the discussion and we’re glad to see the conversation doesn’t look like it’s stopping anytime soon. 

 All female Aussie band Stonefield told Tonedeaf about how they experienced inappropriate remarks when they used to go to largely male dominated rock competitions. 

“I definitely notice there are comments that probably wouldn’t be said about male bands. Just inappropriate things with like way older men saying,” Findlay takes on the voice of a gruff drunkard, “Can I get your number? You’re sexy.” 

The band said they simply ignore the remarks as something they have to deal with in the industry. But why should they?

 

Gabriella Climi, the Melbourne artist best known for her track ‘Nothing Sweet About Me’ told the Independent about how her record company decided to sex up her image for her second album with lyrics such as ‘I love it with your hands all over me’ and ‘superhot ride’. She appeared topless in FHM, something that she regrets. 

 ”At the time it was sold to me that I would have approval over all shots, but it turns out we didn’t. I was in Australia at the time it came out and I just bawled my eyes out. I did the shoot, so I can’t really blame anyone else for doing it.

“There’s nothing wrong with women celebrating their bodies, but I was so upset because I didn’t want to do it,” she adds. “I’ve had some really great men working on my campaigns but sometimes they can get really carried away.”

The pressure to be sexy and something she wasn’t came to a head when she suffered from an anxiety attack as she was about to go on stage for a sports event dressed as a sexy alien. 

“I had to perform ”On a Mission“ dressed as a sexy alien and I thought, ‘this is so far from where I wanted to be, how did I end up doing this?’” she says. “I remember bawling my eyes out.

Bursting onto the scene with her first album when she was just a teenager, Climi describes how for her second album the male record executives took control, and her music wasn’t being marketed the way she had anticipated. She said that it was so over sexualised, not true to herself, and was not what she wanted. It made her so upset to the point that she almost quit. 

This pressure to be sexy, and female artists being judged on their looks rather than their talent seems like it’s sadly normal in the music industry if Stonefield’s and Climi’s accounts are anything to go by. However if artists like these keep speaking out maybe we’ll see a change in the way female artists are oversexualised, and convinced into uncomfortable situations by record industry professionals.

 

What do you think about female artists speaking out?

 

Do you think it might start to change the way women are treated in the industry?

 

-Rocheen.